New Korean War Memorial Features Hundreds of Misspelled Names

Photo Credit: The United States Army Band / Flickr CC BY 2.0

The Wall of Remembrance at the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC’s West Potomac Park was intended to honor the servicemen who lost their lives during the conflict. However, the $22 million project has recently caused public outcry, after a New York Times report revealed it features hundreds of misspellings and omits the names of at least 500 veterans.

Aerial view of the Korean War Veterans Memorial
Korean War Veterans Memorial. (Photo Credit: Carol M. Highsmith / Library of Congress’ Prints and Photographs Division / Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain)

The 380-foot granite Wall of Remembrance was erected as part of an overall rehabilitation of the Korean War Veterans Memorial. Construction began in March 2021, with the groundbreaking ceremony occurring two months later. It was officially unveiled in summer 2022, encircling the Pool of Remembrance, which details the number of servicemen who were killed, wounded, went missing or held as prisoners of war (POWs) during the conflict.

The decision to erect the addition to the memorial was codified under the Korean War Veterans Memorial Wall of Remembrance Act in October 2016.

Moon Jae-in and Lloyd Austin participating in the groundbreaking ceremony for the Wall of Remembrance at the Korean War Veterans Memorial
Groundbreaking ceremony for the Wall of Remembrance at the Korean War Veterans Memorial, May 2021. (Photo Credit: Kevin Dietsch / Getty Images)

According to the National Parks Service (NPS), the Wall of Remembrance was meant to include “the names of 36,574 American servicemen and more than 7,200 members of the Korean Augmentation to the United States Army who gave their lives defending the people of South Korea.” However, a report from the New York Times has revealed that a number of names are missing, with some of those inscribed being misspelled.

According to Hal Barker, the historian behind the Korean War Project database, there are an estimated 1,015 misspelled words and names of deceased servicemen on the Wall of Remembrance. Additionally, the names of 245 veterans whose deaths were not related to the war were accidentally inscribed on the granite, while 500 of those intended to be added were completely omitted.

White rose placed atop the Wall of Remembrance at the Korean War Veterans Memorial
Wall of Remembrance at the Korean War Veterans Memorial. (Photo Credit: Maryland GovPics / Flickr CC BY 2.0)

Among those whose names were misspelled is Lt. Junior Grade John “Jack” Koelsch, the first helicopter pilot to receive the Medal of Honor. He was held prisoner following his chopper being downed by enemy fire while trying to rescue another pilot. Despite repeated torture by his captors, he refused to reveal any information that would potentially aid the enemy. He died of dysentery and malnutrition while held captive.

Another whose name was butchered is Cpl. Frederick Bald Eagle Bear, misspelled on the Wall of Remembrance as “Eagle B F Bald.” The recipient of the Silver Star, he served with the 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division and was killed in action (KIA) on March 11, 1953.

Among those mistakenly included on the Wall of Remembrance include a US Marine who lived for another 60 years after the war, a soldier who accidentally drank antifreeze thinking it was alcohol and one who was killed while riding a motorcycle in Hawaii.

Military portrait of John Koelsch
Lt. Junior Grade John Koelsch is among those whose names are misspelled on the Wall of Remembrance at the Korean War Veterans Memorial. (Photo Credit: US Navy / Naval Historical Center Online Library / Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain)

When the decision to add a list of individual servicemen to the Korean War Veterans Memorial was made, the Korean War Veterans Memorial Foundation approached Barker and his brother, Edward, for a complete list of names. They agreed, but noted it would take time to check and proofread each name before they were etched into the Wall of Remembrance.

However, it appears an error-riddled list was provided, instead, by the Department of Defense, which the Barkers say didn’t appear to have “much rhyme or reason,” according to the New York Times article.

This was a concern for the NPS, which encountered issues with servicemen accidentally being omitted from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall. This led to over 300 names being added in the decades since it was unveiled.

Yumi Hogan standing in front of the Wall of Remembrance at the Korean War Veterans Memorial
Yumi Hogan attending the dedication ceremony for the Wall of Remembrance at the Korean War Veterans Memorial, July 2022. (Photo Credit: Maryland GovPics / Flickr CC BY 2.0)

The brothers point the blame at various federal agencies, including the Department of Defense, and the Korean War Veterans Memorial Foundation. In response to the new report, the former released a statement, which read, “We encourage all family members or concerned citizens to notify the Department of any names that were omitted, misspelled, or included in error.”

In a separate article by WUSA9, a Department spokesperson said, “The errors are a very unfortunate mistake and the DOD is working in tandem with the Dept. of Interior to correct those mistakes.”

The Korean War Veterans Memorial Foundation declined to comment when approached by the New York Times.

Soldier standing at attention in front of a large wreath
Dedication ceremony for the Wall of Remembrance at the Korean War Veterans Memorial, July 2022. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Josue Patricio / 3rd US Infantry Regiment “The Old Guard” / DVIDS / Public Domain)

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For their part, the Barkers have said that the entire project should be scrapped and a new Wall of Remembrance constructed, this time without any of the names being misspelled.

Clare Fitzgerald

Clare Fitzgerald is a Writer and Editor with eight years of experience in the online content sphere. Graduating with a Bachelor of Arts from King’s University College at Western University, her portfolio includes coverage of digital media, current affairs, history and true crime.

Among her accomplishments are being the Founder of the true crime blog, Stories of the Unsolved, which garners between 400,000 and 500,000 views annually, and a contributor for John Lordan’s Seriously Mysterious podcast. Prior to its hiatus, she also served as the Head of Content for UK YouTube publication, TenEighty Magazine.

In her spare time, Clare likes to play Pokemon GO and re-watch Heartland over and over (and over) again. She’ll also rave about her three Maltese dogs whenever she gets the chance.

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