Hair-Raising Moment When Soldier’s Beret Is Accidently Shot Off During Honor Salute (Watch)

It almost turned into a tragedy. Just a few inches saved the life of this soldier, or at least his saved him from serious injury…. yet he barely even flinched! What’s more – the ceremony continued like nothing happened, though surely some people noticed that unlucky shot. It required nerves of steel to stay calm under those circumstances when your comrade behind you just shot off your beret (probably accidentally). This Salute was conducted by Polish soldiers used to display respect at a funeral.

The Honor Salute is a ceremonial act performed at military and police funerals in many countries across the world as part of the drill and ceremony of the Honor Guard. It consists of a rifle party firing (usually blank) cartridges into the air three times. The custom originates from the European dynastic wars, where the fighting ceased so the dead and wounded could be removed. Then, three shots were fired into the air to signal that the battle could resume.

Honour Salute during funeral of cavalrymen. Photo was made between 1914-1917 [Public Domain]
Honor Salute during a funeral of Polish cavalrymen during WW1
The firearm used is typically a rifle, in this case, it was is an AKMS 7.62mm assault rifle designed by Mikhail Kalashnikov. It is a common modernized variant of the AK-47 rifle developed in the 1940s.

The metal stock of the AKMS is somewhat different from the folding stock of the previous AKS-47 model as it has a modified locking mechanism, which locks both support arms of the AKMS stock instead of just one (left arm) as in the AKS-47 folding model. It is also made of riveted steel pressings, instead of the milled versions of most AKS-47s.

Sailors from the United States Navy form a rifle party and fire a volley salute on the deck of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln during a burial at sea ceremony [U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Aaron Hubner/Released]
Sailors from the United States Navy form a rifle party and fire a volley salute on the deck of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln during a burial at sea ceremony.
 The party usually stands so that the muzzles are pointed over the casket. However, if mourners are present near the grave, the party stands some distance away (often recommended at least 50 feet) so as to not deafen the attendees and minimize the disturbance.