National WWI Museum and Memorial Commemorates the Centennial of the World War I Armistice with Special Events

 
National WWI Museum and Memorial
 
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Firing on the First World War’s Western Front ended on Nov. 11, 1918. This year marks 100 years since the stillness fell across the battlefields of Europe on the “the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month.”

To commemorate the end of World War I, President Woodrow Wilson officially recognized Nov. 11 as Armistice Day – a day of somber remembrance recognized around the world, with many stopping for a moment of silence at the 11th hour of this day to honor those who brought about the end of the “Great War.”

The National WWI Museum and Memorial will capture the world’s attention with activities for all ages to commemorate the end of the war, beginning Nov. 1 through the centennial of the World War I Armistice on Nov. 11.

Men of U.S. 64th Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, celebrate the news of the Armistice, November 11, 1918

Highlights will include Peace and Remembrance, a spectacular illumination of America’s official World War I Memorial beginning at 7 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 2. The lighting display will continue for nine consecutive evenings leading up to Armistice Day on Nov. 11 to recognize the 9 million soldiers who made the ultimate sacrifice during the Great War.

Comprised of nearly 55 million pixels to cover the Memorial with red poppies – a traditional symbol for commemorating military personnel who died inspired by the World War I poem “In Flanders Field” — the display will be created by DWP Live, a stage and special effects producer for major artists including Adele and Beyonce as well as Super Bowl halftime shows.

From Friday, Nov. 9 through Sunday, Nov. 11, admission to the Museum and Memorial is free for veterans and active-duty military personnel; general admission for the public is half-price.

Armistice Day Parade, 1918, Allentown PA.

On Sunday, Nov. 11, the Museum and Memorial hosts a multi-national Armistice Commemoration Ceremony beginning at 9:30 a.m. in the Museum’s Memorial Courtyard. Free to the public, this special ceremony features moving readings of letters from soldiers, poetry, musical performances and more.

The United States World War One Centennial Commission is the presenting sponsor of the Museum and Memorial’s Armistice Commemoration activities with Pioneer Services serving as the premier sponsor and Jackson County Executive and Legislature, the Neighborhood Tourist Development Fund of Kansas City, Mo., and Wells Fargo providing additional support.

For more information, visit HERE.

The announcing of the armistice on November 11, 1918, Philadelphia.

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES

REFLECTIONS OF HOPE: ARMISTICE 1918

When: All Day through Sunday, Nov. 11

Where: Reflection Pool outside the National WWI Museum and Memorial

What: Artist Ada Koch’s moving installation features 117 intricate metal poppy sculptures in a symbolic arrangement. Each poppy represents 1,000 American soldiers killed during the Great War.

2018 SYMPOSIUM

When: Thursday-Saturday, Nov. 1-3

Where: J.C. Nichols Auditorium inside the National WWI Museum and Memorial

What: Explore the irrevocable changes years of cataclysmic conflict wrought on the global stage during 1918: Crucible of War, this year’s Symposium. Discover the complex impact on familiar structures as war was fought on three diverse continents of battlefields and the waters that connected them to the American homefront. As borders were literally and figuratively redrawn, Allies celebrated a victory and the world came to terms with the irreparable devastation and losses of the “war to end all wars.”

PEACE AND REMEMBRANCE

When: Friday-Sunday, Nov. 2-11 (Starting at 7 p.m. on Nov. 2-3; and at 6 p.m. on Nov. 4-11)

Where: North Lawn outside the National WWI Museum and Memorial

What: The official WWI memorial of the United States will be illuminated with a nearly 55 million pixel display featuring more than 5,000 poppies each evening with a massive and moving light installation. Peace and Remembrance occurs for nine days leading up to Nov. 11 in recognition of the nine million soldiers who made the ultimate sacrifice during the war. The United States World War One Centennial Commission is the presenting sponsor of Peace and Remembrance. FREE to the public.

WORLD WAR I RESEARCH STATIONS

When: All Day, Friday-Sunday, Nov. 9-11

Where: Outside J.C. Nichols Auditorium Lobby inside the National WWI Museum and Memorial

What: Find your connection to World War I during Memorial Day weekend through research stations. With access to multiple databases including, Fold3.com, Ancestry.com, the Museum and Memorial’s online collections database, the American Battlefield Monuments Commission and the National Archives, discover how the Great War affected your family through records, photographs and much more. FREE to the public.

CRAFT YOUR OWN POPPY

When: 10 a.m. – Noon, Saturday, Nov. 10

Where: J.C. Nichols Auditorium Lobby inside the National WWI Museum and Memorial

What: Commemorate the Armistice by creating your own felt poppy pin or ornament in this family-friendly craft experience. FREE to the public.

HANDS-ON HISTORY

When: 11 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 10

Where: Near Paul Sunderland Glass Bridge inside the National WWI Museum and Memorial

What: History is brought to life during this family-friendly program, where kids of all ages are invited to handle Great War artifacts. FREE to the public.

ARMISTICE CEREMONY

When: 9:30 a.m., Sunday, Nov. 11

Where: Memorial Courtyard outside the National WWI Museum and Memorial

What: Join us for a multi-national commemoration of the Armistice of 1918 featuring moving readings of poems and letters from soldiers, musical performances and more. FREE to the public.

BELLS OF PEACE

When: 10:55 a.m., Sunday, Nov. 11

Where: Memorial Courtyard outside the National WWI Museum and Memorial

What: Exactly 100 years after fighting ceased in Europe, organizations across the globe participate in a traditional bell tolling to commemorate this momentous event. Those unable to attend the ceremony are also invited to toll bells at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11 to honor those who served. Collectively, the sound of bells represent this incredible moment of peace.

The bell used for this ceremony was originally located at one of the federal buildings in downtown Kansas City and was rung daily by the Daughters of the American Revolution during U.S. involvement in WWI (1917-1918). It was also tolled 11 times at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11, 1926 during the dedication ceremony of the Liberty Memorial. FREE to the public.

WALK OF HONOR DEDICATION CEREMONY

When: 2 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 11

Where: J.C. Nichols Auditorium inside the National WWI Museum and Memorial

What: More than 100 new Walk of Honor granite bricks will be dedicated during a special ceremony. The Walk of Honor, now more than 11,000 bricks strong, is divided into three sections: bricks dedicated solely to those who served in World War I; bricks dedicated to veterans of any military service; and bricks that honor civilian friends, family or organizations. Walk of Honor bricks are dedicated twice each year during Memorial Day and Veterans Day ceremonies. FREE to the public.

ARMISTICE COMMEMORATION HOURS AND PARKING

The National WWI Museum and Memorial will be open on regular days/hours during the Armistice commemoration with the exception of Sunday, Nov. 11 (9 a.m. – 5 p.m.). To accommodate expected high attendance, additional parking will be available on the Southeast lawn of the complex (weather permitting). Visitors seeking to view the Peace and Remembrance illumination are welcome to use available parking on the Museum and Memorial grounds.