Fast Facts About The Battle of Guadalcanal

 
A U.S. Marine patrol crosses the Matanikau River in September 1942.
 
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One of the most famous battles in the history of the United States Marine Corps, Guadalcanal takes its name from a small volcanic island in the west Pacific island chain. This relatively minor place on the route from East Asia to Australasia was the site of one of the hardest fought battles of the Second World War, one which was vital in turning the tide of the Japanese advance.

1. Reaching for Australia

Japanese control of the western Pacific area between May and August 1942. Guadalcanal is located in the lower right center of the map.
Japanese control of the western Pacific area between May and August 1942. Guadalcanal is located in the lower right center of the map.

In early 1942, Japan was on the offensive. Having already occupied sections of mainland East Asia, the empire of the rising sun was expanding south along the island chain that led from there to Australia. Their agenda was a simple one – to control trade routes in that part of the Pacific, thus ensuring their own supplies and cutting off those of their enemies, in particular China.

To do this, the aggressive Japanese army, supported by a more cautious but no less dedicated navy, aimed to conquer all the way down to Australia, removing any foothold from which the United States and European powers could strike back.

The furthest point of their expansion was Guadalcanal, the largest of the southern Solomon Islands. Owned by the British since 1893, it was occupied by the Japanese in July 1942. As the invaders set about building an airstrip, from which they could launch air defences as well as bombing raids against Allied fleets, the need to re-take the island became urgent.

2. Bring in the Marines

U.S. Marines debark from LCP(L)s onto Guadalcanal on 7 August 1942.
U.S. Marines debark from LCP(L)s onto Guadalcanal on 7 August 1942.

The invasion of Guadalcanal was thrown together in haste, earning it the nickname “Operation Shoestring” among the troops taking part. 19,000 troops of the US 1st Marine Division under General Vandergrift took part in the initial seaborne invasion.

The operation was a tough prospect. The Marines were understrength and many lacked combat experience. Their landing craft were initially only able to provide ten days’ worth of ammunition and sixty days of fuel and food.  Admiral Fletcher, fearful of placing his ships in a vulnerable position, did not provide the close support of naval and aerial bombardments for which they had hoped.

Marines_rest_in_the_field_on_Guadalcanal
United States Marines rest in the field during the Guadalcanal campaign.

Fortunately for the Americans, the Japanese were also ill prepared. Misinformed about events elsewhere in the Pacific, the local commander did not believe that the Americans could launch a substantial attack.

The invasion initially went well. Landing on 7 August, the Marines seized smaller surrounding islands and advanced easily from the beaches inland on Guadalcanal. The next day they took the airfield, giving them a strong base of operations with bunkers and a road to the coast.

3. War at Sea

The carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6) under aerial attack during the Battle of the Eastern Solomons.
The carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6) under aerial attack during the Battle of the Eastern Solomons.

Meanwhile, Fletcher withdrew his fleet, leaving the marines unsupported from the sea. A furious Admiral Turner sent two other fleets – one American and one Australian – to fill the gap. But the Japanese Admiral Mikawa had reached the area, and would punish the Allies for Fletcher’s withdrawal.

The fighting at sea was vital to the fate of Guadalcanal, and it began badly for the Allies. The first of five related sea battles ended with the loss of four cruisers – three American and one Australian – as well as a fifth badly damaged.

With the Japanese controlling the seas, Turner had to withdraw vulnerable supply and transport ships, leaving the marines cut off. Fletcher was ordered to return some of his ships to the area, while the Japanese increased their own naval presence, hoping for revenge for their defeat at Midway.

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