These 44 Pictures From The Atlantic Wall Show What The Allies Were Up Against On D-Day

 
 
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Infantry Inland

Fearsome Fallschirmjager, and elite soldiers of Wehrmacht (By Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-586-2225-16 / Slickers / CC-BY-SA 3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 de, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5413042)
Fearsome Fallschirmjager, considered elite soldiers. Photo Credit.
Heavy gunner with MG42, Caen, France, 1944 (Image).
Heavy gunner with MG42, Caen, France, 1944. Photo Credit.
German soldiers are looking out, Normandy, 1944 (Image).
German soldiers on the lookout in Normandy, 1944. Photo Credit.
21 June 1944. Photo Credit.
21 June 1944. Photo Credit.
During their first week of action in Normandy, these three soldiers of the Hitlerjugend Division earned the Iron Cross (Image).
During their first week of action in Normandy, these three soldiers of the Hitlerjugend Division earned the Iron Cross. Photo Credit.
Soldier of Wehmracht with Karabiner 98k. 21 June 1944. Photo Credit.
Soldier of Wehrmacht with Karabiner 98k. 21 June 1944. Photo Credit.
German infantrymen scan the skies for Allied aircraft in Normandy, 1944 (Image)
German infantrymen scan the skies for Allied aircraft in Normandy, 1944. Photo Credit.
An abandoned Waco CG-4 glider is examined by German troops. Photo Credit.
An abandoned Waco CG-4 glider is examined by German troops. Photo Credit.
Rommel inspecting 21st Panzer Division in May, 1944. Photo Credit.
Rommel inspecting 21st Panzer Division in May, 1944. Photo Credit.
German Fallschirmjager Trüppen in Normandy, the German Parachute forces fighting in an infantry role were very effective in the Normandy campaign. These machine guns would cause most of the casualties on D-Day and were one of the most feared weapons on the battlefields of World War Two. June 1944 (Image).
German Fallschirmjager Trüppen in Normandy, the German Parachute forces fighting in an infantry role were very effective in the Normandy campaign. These machine guns would cause most of the casualties on D-Day and were one of the most feared weapons on the battlefields of World War Two. June 1944. Photo Credit.

Sounds of the destroyers of men -the murderous German MG34 and MG42 machine guns.

Heavily armed Fallschirmjager alongside a knocked-out Sherman. Note men with tank-killing Panzerschreck and Panzerfaust weapons (Image).
Heavily armed Fallschirmjager alongside a knocked-out Sherman. Note men with tank-killing Panzerschreck and Panzerfaust weapons.
Panzerknacker team hunts Allied armor with a Panzerschreck (Image).
Panzerknacker team hunts Allied armor with a Panzerschreck.
Instructors at a 59th Division school for potential NCOs at Vienne-en-Bessin demonstrate various German anti-tank weapons, including a Panzerschreck, two types of Panzerfaust and anti-tank mines, 1 August 1944 (© IWM (B 8540))
Instructors at a 59th Division school for potential NCOs at Vienne-en-Bessin demonstrate various German anti-tank weapons, including a Panzerschreck, two types of Panzerfaust and anti-tank mines, 1 August 1944 (© IWM (B 8540))
Hauptmann Peter Kiesgen, winner of the Knight’s Cross and former Hitlerjugend leader, helps train new recruits in the use of the Panzerfaust 60 in 1944. The Hauptmann wears five tank destruction badges on his right sleeve, each one awarded for the single-handed destruction of an enemy tank (Image).
Hauptmann Peter Kiesgen, winner of the Knight’s Cross and former Hitlerjugend leader, helps train new recruits in the use of the Panzerfaust 60 in 1944. The Hauptmann wears five tank destruction badges on his right sleeve, each one awarded for the single-handed destruction of an enemy tank.
A Sherman burns in Germany. Common fate for many Allied armour.
A Sherman burns in Germany. A common fate of many Allied tanks.

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