The 1936 Nazi Olympic Venues – Then and Now!

 
 
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Maifield

Maifield is a large lawn which lies right next to Olympic Stadium. During the games, it was used for gymnastics and equestrian events. It covers 28 acres, and can hold over 250,000 people.

This lawn is home to the Olympic Bell Tower as well as Langemark-Halle, which lies beneath the bell tower. The bell tower was accidentally set on fire by Soviet troops after World War II. Because of this, the British tore it down in 1947 after deeming it unsafe. The tower that stands today was built in the early 1960s and was built using the same plans used in the 1930s.

Olympic Bell Tower located on Maifield above The Langemarck-Halle
Olympic Bell Tower located on Maifield above The Langemark-Halle Photo via Wikipedia
The Langemark-Halle lies beneath the Bell Tower and remains largely unchanged
The Langemark-Halle lies beneath the Bell Tower and remains virtually unchanged. It is dedicated to the young soldiers that lost their lives in World War I. Photo via Wikipedia
Plaque showing the Maifield area's past. Note the Bell tower in 1936.
Plaque showing the Maifield area’s past. Note- The photo of the Bell Tower was taken in 1936. Photo via Wikipedia

Olympiapark Schwimmstadion Berlin

The aquatics center sits right next to Olympic Stadium and was a favorite spot amongst spectators. During the games, this swimming center hosted water polo, swimming and diving competitions. Over 140,000 people attended events here during the Olympics. The swimming center is still open today, though the facility has changed a little bit.

Swimming venue as seen in 1936...Photo via Wikipedia
Swimming venue as seen in 1936…Photo via Wikipedia
Swimming venue as seen in 2008. Photo via Wikipedia
Swimming venue as seen in 2008. Photo via Wikipedia

Olympic Village

Located on the edge of Berlin in Elstal, Wustermark, the Village was home to over 4,000 athletes during the games. Here athletes would be welcomed to gyms, swimming pools, large dining halls and more, all designed to enhance their Olympic experience. The village was transformed into a military school three months after the games and then would later serve as barracks for the Soviet Union. It has largely been abandoned for some time now, and only a small portion of it has been restored.

Inside the swimming area. Photo via Wikipedia and The German Federal Archive.
Inside the swimming area. Photo via Wikipedia and The German Federal Archive.
Photo via Wikipedia
Single story housing for the athletes, Photo via Wikipedia and The German Federal Archive.
Multi-level housing was also available to the athletes. photo via Wikipedia and The German Federal Archive.
Multi-level housing was also available to the athletes. Photo via Wikipedia and The German Federal Archive.
Theatersaal_im_Hindenburghaus
This theater, which was located in the Hindenburg Building, was used for general functions. Photo via Wikipedia and the German Federal Archive.
800px-ElstalOlyNationen
The Dining Hall of Nations. This building housed many of the kitchens and dining areas used by Olympians. There were 38 rooms for athletes to dine in. Photo via Wikipedia and The German Federal Archive.
House of Nations as seen from the front side in 1936. Photo via Wikipedia and The German Federal Archive.
The Dining Hall of Nations as seen from the front side in 1936.  Note the Nazi flag flying over the building. Photo via Wikipedia and The German Federal Archive.
The on-site gym. Photo via Wikipedia and The German Federal Archive.
The on-site gym. Photo via Wikipedia and The German Federal Archive.

It has been 80 years since the 1936 Summer Olympics were held. Though times have changed, the buildings remain a testament to the  1936 games’ dark past.