Inside The Cockpit Of One of Only Few Airworthy WW2 Mosquitos Left In The World

 
 
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A Mosquito aircraft actually flying is a rare sight to see these days. There are only a few flightworthy de Haviland Mosquito aircraft left today worldwide, one in the US and one in Canada.

In the video we are about to show you, the Mosquito will not only be flying, but you will see it take off, fly with other classic warplanes, such as the Spitfire, see some spectacular maneuvers, and watch the aircraft land.

During World War II the DH-98 Mosquito was a wooden-built aircraft that flew continuous missions directly on the front-lines. It had two popular nicknames: “The Wooden Wonder,” aptly named, of course, and “Mossie,” as it was fondly called by its two-man crews.

DH98 Mosquito bomber. Wikipedia / Public Domain
DH98 Mosquito bomber, 1944.

Production of the Mosquito bomber started in 1941. When it entered war service in 1942, it was utilized for high-altitude photo-reconnaissance service, and it continued this function of the war effort throughout the war years. It was probably the fastest operational aircraft in the world at this time.

During 1942 and 1943 the Mosquitos flew dangerous low-altitude bombing missions against European targets that were occupied by the Germans, as well as perilous missions against actual German targets such as railway yards, manufacturing plants, and other specific targets.

In 1943, the Mosquito bomber fleet was utilized for ‘night strikes,’ as high-altitude nuisance bombers that the German fighter aircraft were unable to stop. The Mosquito Fleet was also used as the ‘lead’ strike force for the heavy bombing raids into Germany by the RAF Bomber Command.

One example of the precision of the Mosquito daytime strikes was accomplished on 20 January 1943. Whether by design or just a coincidence, this date was the 10th anniversary of the Nazis’ seizure of power and a Mosquito bomber precision strike knocked out the primary broadcasting station in Berlin, while the Commander in Chief, Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring was talking on air, cutting out the power and taking his speech completely off the broadcast!

Whether by design or just a coincidence, this date was the 10th anniversary of the Nazis’ seizure of power and a Mosquito bomber precision strike knocked out the primary broadcasting station in Berlin.

The Commander in Chief, Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring was talking on air, cutting out the power and taking his speech completely off the broadcast!

Now – let’s watch the video!