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USAAF Combat Groups and Squadrons 71- 90th

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71st Reconnaissance Group

Constituted as 71st Observation Group on 21 Aug 1941. Activated on 1 Oct 1941. Trained with B-25, P-38, P-39, and P-40 aircraft. Flew antisubmarine patrols off the west coast, Dec 1941-Jan 1943. Redesignated 71st Reconnaissance Group in Apr 1943, 71st Tactical Reconnaissance Group in May 1944, and 71st Reconnaissance Group in May 1945.

Moved to the Southwest Pacific, Sep-Nov 1943, and assigned to Fifth AF. Equipped with B-25, P-38, P-39, L-4, L-5, and later some L-6 aircraft. Based on New Guinea and Biak, flew reconnaissance missions over New Guinea, New Britain, and the Admiralties to provide target and damage-assessment photographs for air force units. Also bombed and strafed Japanese installations, airfields, and shipping; supported Allied forces on New Guinea and Biak; flew courier missions; participated in rescue operations; and hauled passengers and cargo. Moved to the Philippines in Nov 1944. Flew reconnaissance missions over Luzon to provide information for US forces as to Japanese troop movements, gun positions, and supply routes. Also supported ground forces on Luzon, photographed and bombed airfields in Formosa and China, and attacked enemy shipping off the Asiatic coast. Maj William A Shomo was awarded the Medal of Honor for action on 11 Jan 1945: sighting a formation of thirteen Japanese aircraft while leading a two-plane flight, Maj Shomo attacked the superior enemy force and destroyed seven planes. After moving to Ie Shima in Aug 1945, the group attacked transportation targets on Kyushu and flew over southern Japan to locate prisoner of war camps, to assess bomb damage, and to obtain information on Japanese military movements. Moved to Japan in Oct 1945. Inactivated on 1 Feb 1946.

Activated in Japan on 28 Feb 1947. Assigned to Far East Air Forces. Manned in Nov 1947 and equipped with RB-17, RB-29, RF-51, RF-61, and RF-80 aircraft. Photographed areas of Japan and South Korea. Redesignated 71st Tactical Reconnaissance Group in Aug 1948. Inactivated in Japan on 1 Apr 1949.

Squadrons. 8th: 1947-1949. 17th: 1942-1946. 25th Liaison: 1942-1945. 25th Reconnaissance: 1947-1949. 82d: 1942-1946; 1947-1949. 102d: 1941-1942. 110th: 1941-1946. 128th: 1941-1942.

72nd Reconnaissance Group

Constituted as 72nd Observation Group on 21 Aug 1941. Activated on 26 Sep 1941. Redesignated 72nd Reconnaissance Group in 1943. Used O-47, O-49, O-52, L-1, L-4, B-18, P-39, and other aircraft. Moved to the Panama Canal Zone, Dec 1941-Jan 1942. Flew patrol missions, carried mail, searched for missing aircraft, provided reconnaissance support to ground forces, and occasionally did photographic-mapping work. Disbanded in the Canal Zone on 1 Nov 1943.

Reconstituted and allotted to the reserve, on 13 May 1947. Activated on 12 Jul 1947. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949.

Squadrons. 1st: 1941-1943. 4th: 1942-1943. 39th: 1942-1943. 60th: 1947-1949. 73d Fighter: 1947-1949. 108th: 1941-1943. 124th: 1941.

74th Reconnaissance Group

Constituted as 74th Observation Group on 5 Feb 1942 and activated on 27 Feb. Redesignated 74th Reconnaissance Group in Apr 1943, and 74th Tactical Reconnaissance Group in Aug 1943. Equipped at various times with O-52′s, L-1′s, L-4′s, L-5′s, B-25′s, A-20′s, P-39′s, P-40′s, and P-51′s. Flew reconnaissance, mapping, artillery adjustment, bombing, dive-bombing, and strafing missions to support ground units in training or on maneuvers; trained personnel in aerial reconnaissance, medium bombardment, and fighter techniques. Inactivated on 7 Nov 1945.

Redesignated 74th Reconnaissance Group, allotted to the reserve, and activated, on 27 Dec 1946. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949.

Squadrons. 5th: 1943. 8th: 1945. 11th: 1942-1945. 13th: 1942-1945. 21st: 1947-1949. 22nd Tactical Reconnaissance: 1942-1945. 22nd Photographic Reconnaissance: 1947-1949. 33rd (formerly 31st): 1947-1949. 36th: 1943-1944. 101st: 1945.

75th Reconnaissance Group

Constituted as 75th Observation Group on 5 Feb 1942 and activated on 27 Feb. Redesignated 75th Reconnaissance Group in Apr 1943, and 75th Tactical Reconnaissance Group in Aug 1943. Used B-25′s, A-20′s, L-1′s, L-2′s, L-4′s, O-47′s, O-52′s, P-9′s, P-40′s, and P-51′s. Until the fall of 1942 the group aided ground units with their training by flying reconnaissance, artillery adjustment, strafing, and dive-bombing missions; one squadron (124th) flew antisubmarine patrols over the Gulf of Mexico. In the fall of 1942 the group participated in the Louisiana Maneuvers. Beginning early in 1943 it functioned primarily as a replacement training unit. Disbanded on 1 May 1944.

Squadrons. 21st: 1942-1944. 30th: 1942-1944. 124th: 1942-1944. 127th: 1942-1943.

76th Reconnaissance Group

Constituted as 76th Observation Group on 5 Feb 1942 and activated on 27 Feb. Redesignated 76th Reconnaissance Group in Apr 1943, and 76th Tactical Reconnaissance Group in Aug 1943. Aircraft included P-39′s, P-40′s, A-20′s, B-25′s, L-1′s, L-4′s, L-5′s, and L-6′s. Trained in aerial reconnaissance and air support techniques and aided ground units in their training, Feb 1942-May 1943; assisted Second Army on maneuvers, May-Sep 1943; participated in maneuvers with ground forces in the California-Arizona desert training area beginning in Sep 1943. Disbanded on 15 Apr 1944.

Squadrons. 20th: 1942-1943. 23d: 1942-1943, 1943-1944. 24th: 1942-1943. 70th: 1943. 91st: 1943. 97th: 1943-1944. 101st: 1943-1944. 102d: 1944. 106th: 1943. 121st: 1943.

77th Reconnaissance Group

Constituted as 77th Observation Group on 5 Feb 1942. Activated on 2 Mar 1942. Redesignated 77th Reconnaissance Group in Apr 1943, and 77th Tactical Reconnaissance Group in Aug 1943. Aircraft included P-39′s, P-40′s, A-20′s, B-25′s, O-47′s, O-52′s, and L-5′s. Supported ground units in training by flying reconnaissance, artillery adjustment, fighter, and bomber missions, and in the process trained reconnaissance personnel who later served overseas. One squadron (113th) flew antisubmarine patrols over the Gulf of Mexico from Mar until Jun 1942 when it was relieved by another squadron (128th). Still another squadron (120th) patrolled the Mexican border, Mar-Jul 1942. A detachment of the 77th served in India from Feb until Jul 1943. The group was disbanded on 30 Nov 1943.

Squadrons. 5th: 1942-1943. 27th: 1942-1943. 35th: 1943. 113th: 1942-1943. 120th: 1942-1943. 125th: 1942-1943. 128th: 1942-1943.

78th Fighter Group

Constituted as 78th Pursuit Group (Interceptor) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 9 Feb 1942. Redesignated 78th Fighter Group in May 1942. Trained for combat with P-38′s and served as part of the air defense organization. Moved to England, Nov-Dec 1942. Assigned to Eighth AF. Lost its P-38′s and most of its pilots in Feb 1943 when they were assigned to Twelfth AF for service in North Africa. Began operations from England with P-47′s in Apr 1943, converted to P-51′s in Dec 1944, and continued combat until Apr 1945. Flew many missions to escort bombers that attacked industries, submarine yards and docks, V-weapon sites, and other targets on the Continent. Also engaged in counter-air activities and on numerous occasions strafed and dive-bombed airfields, trains, vehicles, barges, tugs, canal locks, barracks, and troops. In addition to other operations, participated in the intensive campaign against the German Air Force and aircraft industry during Big Week, 20-25 Feb 1944; helped to prepare the way for the invasion of France; supported landings in Normandy in Jun 1944; contributed to the breakthrough at St Lo in Jul 1944; participated in the Battle of the Bulge, Dec 1944-Jan 1945; and supported the airborne assault across the Rhine in Mar 1945. Received a DUC for activities connected with the airborne attack on Holland in Sep 1944 when the group covered troop carrier and bombardment operations and carried out strafing and dive-bombing missions. Received second DUC for destroying numerous aircraft on five airfields near Prague and Pilsen on 16 Apr 1945. Returned to the US in Oct. Inactivated on 18 Oct 1945.

Activated in Germany on 20 Aug 1946. Assigned to United States Air Forces in Europe for duty with the occupation force. Transferred, without personnel and equipment, to the US in Jun 1947 and had few, if any, personnel assigned until Nov 1948. Equipped with F-84′s in the spring of 1949. Redesignated 78th Fighter-Interceptor Group in Jan 1950. Inactivated on 6 Feb 1952.

Redesignated 78th Fighter Group (Air Defense). Activated on 18 Aug 1955. Assigned to Air Defense Command.

Squadrons. 82d: 1942-1945; 1946-1952. 83d: 1942-1945; 1946-1952; 1955-. 84th: 1942-1945; 1946-1952; 1955-.

79th Fighter Group

Constituted as 79th Pursuit Group (Interceptor) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 9 Feb 1942. Redesignated 79th Fighter Group in May 1942. Moved to the Middle East, Oct-Nov 1942, and became part of Ninth AF. Trained with P-40′s while moving westward in the wake of the British drive across Egypt and Libya to Tunisia. Although many of the group’s pilots flew combat missions with other organizations, the 79th group itself did not begin operations until Mar 1943. By escorting bombers, attacking enemy shipping, and supporting ground forces, the 79th took part in the Allied operations that defeated Axis forces in North Africa, captured Pantelleria, and conquered Sicily, the group being awarded a DUC for its support of British Eighth Army during that period, Mar-Aug 1943. Assigned to Twelfth AF in Aug 1943 and continued to support British Eighth Army by attacking troop concentrations, gun positions, bridges, roads, and rail lines in southern Italy. Operated in the area of the Anzio beachhead, Jan-Mar 1944. Participated in the drive on Rome, Mar-Jun 1944, and converted to P-47′s during that time. Flew escort and strafing missions in southern France during Aug and Sep 1944, and afterward engaged in interdictory and close support operations in northern Italy. Received second DUC for numerous missions flown at minimum altitude in intense flak to help pierce the enemy line at the Santerno River in Italy, 16-20 Apr 1945. Remained overseas as part of United States Air Forces in Europe after the war. Transferred, without personnel and equipment, to the US in Jun 1947. Inactivated on 15 Jul 1947.

Redesignated 79th Fighter Group (Air Defense). Activated on 18 Aug 1955. Assigned to Air Defense Command.

Squadrons. 85th: 1942-1947. 86th: 1942-1947; 1955-. 87th: 1942-1947.

80th Fighter Group

Constituted as 80th Pursuit Group (Interceptor) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on Feb 1942. Redesignated 80th Fighter Group in May 1942. Used P-47′s to train for combat and to serve as part of the defense force for the northeastern US. Sailed for India, via Brazil, Cape of Good Hope, and Ceylon, in May 1943. Assigned to Tenth AF. Began operations in Sep 1943 with P-38 and P-40 aircraft; later used P-47′s. Supported Allied ground forces during the battle for northern Burma and the push southward to Rangoon, bombing and strafing troop concentrations, supply dumps, lines of communication, artillery positions, and other objectives. Defended the Indian terminus of the Hump route by striking Japanese airfields and by patrolling Allied airfields to safeguard them from attack. Received a DUC for intercepting a formation of enemy planes and preventing its attack on a large oil refinery in Assam, India, on 27 Mar 1944. Returned to the US in Oct 1945. Inactivated on 3 Nov 1945.

Squadrons. 88th: 1942-1945. 89th: 1942-1945. 90th: 1942-1945. 459th: 1943-1944.

81st Fighter Group

Constituted as 81st Pursuit Group (Intercepter) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 9 Feb 1942. Redesignated 81st Fighter Group in May 1942. Trained with P-39′s. Moved overseas, Oct 1942-Feb 1943, the ground echelon arriving, in French Morocco with the force that invaded North Africa on 8 Nov, and the air echelon, which had trained for a time in England, arriving in North Africa between late Dec 1942 and early Feb 1943. Began combat with Twelfth AF in Jan 1943. Supported ground operations during the Allied drive against Axis forces in Tunisia. Patrolled the coast of Africa and protected Allied shipping in the Mediterranean Sea, Apr-Jul 1943. Provided cover for the convoys that landed troops on Pantelleria on II Jun and on Sicily on 10 Jul 1943. Supported the landings at Anzio on 22 Jan 1944 and flew patrols in that area for a short time. Moved to India, Feb-Mar 1944, and began training with P-40 and P-47 aircraft. Moved to China in May and became part of Fourteenth AF. Continued training and on occasion flew patrol and escort missions before returning to full-time combat duty in Jan 1945. Attacked enemy airfields and installations, flew escort missions, and aided the operations of Chinese ground forces by attacking troop concentrations, ammunition dumps, lines of communications, and other targets to hinder Japanese efforts to move men and materiel to the front. Inactivated in China on 27 Dec 1945.

Activated in Hawaii on 15 Oct 1946. Equipped with P-51′s; converted to F-47′s early in 1948. Moved to the US in 1949 and converted to jet aircraft, receiving F-80′s at first but changing to F-86′s soon afterward.

Redesignated 81st Fighter-Interceptor Group in Jan 1950. Moved to England, Aug-Sep 1951. Assigned to United States Air Forces in Europe. Redesignated 81st Fighter-Bomber Group in Apr 1954. Inactivated in England on 8 Feb 1955.

Squadrons. 78th: 1952-1955. 91st: 1942-1945; 1946-1955. 92d: 1942-1945; 1946-1955. 93d: 1942-1945; 1946-1951. 116th: 1951-1952.

82d Fighter Group

Constituted as 82nd Pursuit Group (Interceptor) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 9 Feb 1942. Redesignated 82nd Fighter Group in May 1942. Trained with P-38′s. Moved to Northern Ireland during Sep-Oct 1942 for further training. Moved to North Africa in Dec 1942 and served with Twelfth AF until Nov 1943. Took part in the defeat of Axis forces in Tunisia, the reduction of Pantelleria, the conquest of Sicily, and the invasion of Italy. Operated against the enemy’s air transports; flew dive-bombing and strafing missions; escorted medium bombers in their attacks on enemy shipping and their raids on Naples and Rome; and gave direct support to the ground forces during the invasion of Italy. Received a DUC for a low-level strafing raid against enemy aircraft concentrations at Foggia on 25 Aug 1943. Received second DUC for performance on 2 Sep 1943 when the group protected a formation of bombers that encountered strong opposition from enemy interceptors during an attack on marshalling yards near Naples.

Moved to Italy in Oct 1943. Assigned to Fifteenth AF in Nov. Continued to function occasionally as a fighter-bomber organization, supporting Allied armies, flying interdictory missions, and attacking strategic targets. Received third DUC for performance on 10 Jun 1944 when the 82nd Group braved head-on attacks by hostile fighters to dive-bomb an oil refinery at Ploesti and then strafed targets of opportunity while returning to base. Engaged primarily in escort work, however, from Oct 1943 to May 1945, covering the operations of heavy bombers that attacked aircraft industries, oil refineries, and other targets in France, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Rumania, and Bulgaria. Inactivated in Italy on 9 Sep 1945.

Activated in the US on 12 Apr 1947. Assigned to Strategic Air Command and equipped with P-51′s. Assigned to Continental Air Command in Aug 1949. Inactivated on 2 Oct 1949.

Redesignated 82nd Fighter Group (Air Defense). Activated on 18 Aug 1955. Assigned to Air Defense Command and equipped with F-94 aircraft.

Squadrons. 95th: 1942-1945; 1947-1949. 96th: 1942-1945; 1947-1949; 1955-. 97th: 1942-1945; 1947-1949; 1955-.

83rd Fighter Group

Constituted as 83rd Fighter Group on 18 Sep 1943 and activated on 25 Sep. Assigned to First AF. Served as a replacement training unit to train pilots for duty in P-47′s. Disbanded on 10 Apr 1944.

Reconstituted, redesignated 83rd Fighter-Day Group, and assigned to Tactical Air Command, on 24 Feb 1956. Activated on 8 Jul 1956.

(This group is not related to an 83rd Pursuit Group (Interceptor) that was constituted on 13 Jan 1942; activated at New Orleans by Third AF on 9 Feb 1942; assigned the 301st, 302nd, and 303rd squadrons; and disbanded a few days later in order to bring AAF within the authorized number of pursuit groups.)

Squadrons. 448th: 1943-1944. 532d: 1943-1944; 1956-. 533d: 1943-1944; 1956-. 534th: 1943-1944; 1956-.

84th Fighter Group

Constituted as 84th Bombardment Group (Light) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 10 Feb 1942. Redesignated 84th Bombardment Group (Dive) in Jul 1942, and 84th Fighter-Bomber Group in Aug 1943. Assigned to Third AF and later (Nov 1943) to Second AF. Aircraft included A-24′s (1942-1943) and P-47′s (1943-1944). Served as an operational training and a replacement training unit. Also participated occasionally in demonstrations and maneuvers. Disbanded on 1 Apr 1944.

Reconstituted, redesignated 84th Fighter Group (All Weather), and allotted to the reserve, on 26 May 1949. Activated on 1 Jun 1949. Ordered into active service on 1 Jun 1951. Inactivated on 2 Jun 1951.

Redesignated 84th Fighter Group (Air Defense). Activated on 18 Aug 1955. Assigned to Air Defense Command. Equipped with F-86 aircraft.

Squadrons. 491st (formerly 304th): 1942-1944. 496th (formerly 301st): 1942-1944; 1949-1951. 497th (formerly 302nd): 1942-1944; 1955-. 498th (formerly 303rd): 1942-1944; 1955-.

85th Fighter Group

Constituted as 85th Bombardment Group (Light) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 10 Feb 1942. Redesignated 85th Bombardment Group (Dive) in Jul 1942, and 85th Fighter-Bomber Group in Aug 1943. Assigned to Third AF, then to Second, and again to Third. Equipped first with V-72 aircraft; converted to A-24′s in Aug 1942, A-36′s early in 1943, and P-40′s early in 1944, receiving a few P-47′s in Mar 1944. Participated in maneuvers in California during fall and winter of 1942-1943 and in Kentucky in April 1943. Afterward served as a replacement training unit. Disbanded on 1 May 1944.

Squadrons. 499th (formerly 305th): 1942-1944. 500th (formerly 306th): 1942-1944. 501st (formerly 307th): 1942-1944. 502nd (formerly 308th) 1942-1944.

86th Fighter Group

Constituted as 86th Bombardment Group (Light) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 10 Feb 1942. Redesignated 86th Bombardment Group (Dive) in Sep 1942, 86th Fighter-Bomber Group in Aug 1943, and 86th Fighter Group in May 1944. Moved to North Africa, Mar-May 1943. Trained until Jul, then began combat with Twelfth AF. Engaged primarily in close support of ground forces, with the group moving forward to bases in Sicily, Italy, Corsica, France, and Germany as the battle line changed. Also flew patrol and interdictory missions. Used A-36, P-40, and P-47 aircraft to attack convoys, trains, ammunition dumps, troop and supply columns, shipping, bridges, rail lines, and other objectives. Participated in the softening up of Sicily and supported the invasion by Seventh Army in Jul 1943. Provided cover for the landings at Salerno in Sep 1943. Assisted the Allied advance toward Rome during Jan-Jun 1944. Supported the invasion of Southern France in Aug 1944. Operated against enemy communications in northern Italy from Sep 1944 to Apr 1945. Attacked enemy transportation in Germany during Apr and May 1945. Received two DUC’s: for action on 25 May 1944 when the group repeatedly dived through intense flak to destroy enemy vehicles and troops as German forces tried to stop the Allies short of Rome; for activity against convoys and airfield installations in northern Germany on 20 Apr 1945 to disorganize the enemy’s withdrawal from that area. Remained in Germany after the war as part of United States Air Forces in Europe. Transferred, without personnel and equipment, to the US in Feb 1946. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946.

Activated in Germany on 20 Aug 1946. Assigned to United States Air Forces in Europe. Redesignated 86th Composite Group in May 1947, 86th Fighter Group in Jan 1948, 86th Fighter-Bomber Group in Jan 1950, and 86th Fighter-Interceptor Group in Aug 1954. Equipped successively with F-47, F-84, and F-86 aircraft.

Squadrons. 45th: 1947-1948. 311th: 1942-1943. 525th (formerly 309th): 1942-1946; 1946-. 526th (formerly 310th): 1942-1946; 1946-. 527th (formerly 312th): 1942-1946; 1946-1947, 1948-.

87th Fighter Group

Constituted as 87th Fighter Group on 24 Sep 1943. Activated on 1 Oct 1943. Assigned to First AF. Trained replacement pilots, using P-47′s. Disbanded on 10 Apr 1944.

Reconstituted on 16 May 1949 and allotted to the reserve. Activated on 27 Jun 1949. Redesignated 87th Fighter-Escort Group in Mar 1950. Ordered into active service on 1 May 1951. Inactivated on 25 Jun 1951.

Redesignated 87th Troop Carrier Group (Medium) and allotted to the reserve. Activated on 15 Jun 1952. Inactivated on 1 Feb 1953.

(This group is not related to an 87th Pursuit Group (Interceptor) that was constituted on 13 Jan 1942; activated at Selfridge Field by Third AF on 10 Feb 1942; assigned the 304th, 305th, and 306th squadrons; and disbanded a few days later in order to bring AAF within the authorized number of pursuit groups.)

Squadrons. 450th: 1943-1944. 535th: 1943-1944; 1949-1951; 1952-1953. 536th: 1943-1944; 1952-1953. 537th: 1943-1944; 1952-1953.

88th Bombardment Group

Constituted as 88th Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 15 Jul 1942, but not manned until Sep. Equipped with B-17′s. Served for a short time as an operational training unit and afterward as a replacement training unit. Assigned to Second and later to Third AF. Inactivated on 1 May 1944.

Squadrons. 316th: 1942-1944. 317th: 1942-1944. 318th: 1942-1944. 399th: 1942-1944.

89th Troop Carrier Group

Constituted as 89th Transport Group on 19 Jan 1942. Activated on 1 Feb 1942. Assigned to Air Transport Command (later I Troop Carrier Command) in Apr 1942. Redesignated 89th Troop Carrier Group in Jul 1942. Provided transition training for pilots, using DC-3′s and later C-47′s. Began training replacement crews in Mar 1944. Disbanded on 14 Apr 1944.

Reconstituted, allotted to the reserve, and redesignated 89th Troop Carrier Group (Medium), on 10 May 1949. Activated on 27 Jun 1949. Ordered to active service on 1 May 1951. Inactivated on 10 May 1951.

Redesignated 89th Fighter-Bomber Group and allotted to the reserve. Activated on 14 Jun 1952.

Squadrons. 24th: 1942-1944; 1949-1951; 1952-. 25th: 1942-1944; 1949-1951; 1952-. 26th: 1942-1944; 1949-1951; 1952-. 27th: 1942. 28th: 1942. 30th: 1942-1944; 1949-1951. 31st: 1942-1944.

90th Bombardment Group

Constituted as 90th Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 15 Apr 1942. Prepared for combat with B-24′s. Moved to Hawaii in Sep 1942 and assigned to Seventh AF. Completed training, moved to the Southwest Pacific in Nov 1942, and assigned to Fifth AF. Entered combat immediately, and from Nov 1942 to Jan 1945 operated from Australia, New Guinea, and Biak, attacking enemy airfields, troop concentrations, ground installations, and shipping in New Guinea, the Bismarck Archipelago, Palau, and the southern Philippines. Received a DUC for strikes, conducted through heavy flak and fighter opposition, on Japanese airfields at Wewak, New Guinea, in Sep 1943. Other operations included participation in the Battle of the Bismarck Sea in Mar 1943 and long-range raids on oil refineries at Balikpapan, Borneo, in Sep and Oct 1943. Moved to the Philippines in Jan 1945. Supported ground forces on Luzon, attacked industries on Formosa, and bombed railways, airfields, and harbor facilities on the Asiatic mainland. Moved to Ie Shima in Aug 1945, and after the war flew reconnaissance missions over Japan and ferried Allied prisoners from Okinawa to Manila. Returned to the Philippines in Dec 1945. Inactivated on 27 Jan 1946.

Redesignated 90th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy). Activated in the US on 1 Jul 1947. Assigned to Strategic Air Command. Probably not manned during 1947 and 1948. Inactivated on 6 Sep 1948.

Redesignated 90th Bombardment Group (Medium). Activated on 2 Jan 1951. Assigned to Strategic Air Command and equipped with B-29′s. Inactivated on 16 Jun 1952.

Squadrons. 319th: 1942-1946; 1947-1948; 1951-1952. 320th: 1942-1946; 1947-1948; 1951-1952. 321st: 1942-1946; 1947-1948; 1951-1952. 400th: 1942-1946.

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