Top 10 Strangest Armored Cars of WWII

 
 
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5: Bobik

BA-64. Photo Credit.
BA-64. Photo Credit.

The BA-64 – given the moniker Bobik – was a Soviet four-wheeled, lightly-armored scout car. It was used by the Soviet Army from 1942 until the 1960s for liaison and reconnaissance missions. It was not only used during the Second World War but also the Korean War as well.

Various Russian sources differ when it comes to how many Bobiks were actually produced. Nevertheless, the most frequently quoted number are over 9,000 units built by the GAZ automobile plant.

6: The Beaverette

Standard Beaverette.
Standard Beaverette.

The first version of the Standard Beaverette [Standard Car 4×2, or Car Armoured Light Standard], a British armored car, came out in 1940. It was built by the Standard Motor Company upon the promptings of Lord Beaverbrook, thus, the name Standard Beaverette or more commonly, Beaverette.

However, its production was ceased in 1942 after an estimated 2,800 units had been made. It was used by the Royal Air Force and the British Army for training and home defense service. Accordingly, the Beaverette was too heavy to maneuver making it hard for the soldiers to handle.

7: The Scout Car S1

S1 Scout Car.
S1 Scout Car.

The Scout Car S1 was produced by Australia for the use of the US Army during the Second World War per request of the United States Army Air Force [USAAF] in 1942. This light armored car, built by Ford Australia, was used for patrolling and airfield defense. Only forty units of the Scout Car S1 were ever made.

The Scout Car S1 could hold up to five crew members and was equipped with a .50 inch heavy machine gun and two .30-inch machine guns on skate rails.

8: The C15TA Armored Truck

C15TA Armoured Truck. Photo Credit.
C15TA Armoured Truck. Photo Credit.

The C15TA was an armored car built by the Canadians to carry load during WWII. It was developed from the Otter [see number 4] and was built by General Motors Canada in line with the concept for the American M3 Scout Car.

It was used in the Northwest Europe campaign during the Second World War by the Canadian and British units as an armored personnel carrier. It also served as an ambulance during the conflict.

After the war, the countries that took to using the armored car units included Belgium, Denmark, Norway, the Netherlands, Spain, the French, Portugal, South Africa and even the Federation of Malaya.

Some of these vehicles were still in use in the 1960s.

9: The Csaba

39M Csaba. Photo Credit.
39M Csaba. Photo Credit.

Named after the son of Attila, King of the Huns, this armored scout car was made for the use of the Royal Hungarian Army for the Second World War.

The 39M Csaba was designed by the Hungarian expatriate Nicholas Straussler. As a matter of fact, it was just one of the many armored car designs he made for Britain while he was living there in the years between the two world wars. Straussler, then, went into an agreement with the Weiss Manfred Factory — vehicles he designed will be produced by the latter for the use of his home country. The Csaba was the most prominent among all his designs.

A total of 101 Csaba units were manufactured by request of the Hungarian Army. Twenty of these were used in actual combat while the rest were employed as armored command cars and reconnaissance cars.

10: The T27 Armored Car

T27 armored car.
T27 armored car.

This massive armored car was developed by the Studebaker Corporation in 1944 for the US Army. However, it did not go past being a prototype as the actual production was canceled in favor of a competing design made by Chevrolet — the T28 Armored Car.

There were only two T27’s ever produced.